In the last paragraph of today’s Eaton reading, she suggests how the ideal reader of her text will proceed:

Throughout this book, I shall provide examples to clarify the various problems and positions that are discussed. You as a reader are encouraged to consider examples from your own experience. At the risk of becoming, like Socrates, angry at being confused when unable to give completely satisfying answers, you should ask yourself if you know an artist when you see one, or if you know when you are having an aesthetic experience, or if you know when you are looking at something that is truly a work of art.

If I’m successful, you will adopt this approach not only throughout all of Interaction Culture but also it will become a habit of your everyday practice as a designer. Simply do a little find and replace:

You as a design professional are encouraged to consider examples from your own experience. At the risk of becoming, like Socrates, angry [or professionally embarrassed] at being confused when unable to give completely satisfying answers, you should ask yourself if you know a designer when you see one, or if you know when you are having an aesthetic experience [as a consequence of interaction], or if you know when you are looking at something that is truly a work of aesthetic interaction design.

When this sort of sensitivity is habitual and reflexive–when you have “Interaction Culturey” thoughts at Bed, Bath, and Beyond, on Facebook, in Minecraft, or at an airport–you will be a huge step closer to the sort of expert professional critic that underlies (I believe) a key dimension of experience design.

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